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ZIONISM: THE GREATEST THREAT TO THE JEWISH PEOPLE
By: Spencer Pennington

Ever since 1914, the world as a whole has seen a dramatic change in the political, social, religious, and even economic landscapes.  It began with a single gunshot from a member of the Serbian nationalist group “The Black Hand,” which resulted in the death of Austro-Hungarian Archduke Franz Ferdinand, and as we all know, this single assassination reshaped Human history with the initiation of World War I.

The story has been told a million times over: War broke out across Europe as the Triple Alliance of Russia, France, and Britain rushed in to aid Serbia and Austria-Hungary was backed by Germany and the Ottoman Empire, effectively becoming the coalition known as the Central Powers.  While the Germans joined out of a sense of camaraderie for their Austro-Hungarian allies, the Ottomans had joined due to the money that was to be made by supplying Germany and Austria-Hungary with oil for the war, assured of their allies’ victory.  After Russia withdrew from the war in 1917, due to experiencing their own revolution, the United States took their place when a German sea vessel attacked an American civilian ship.  As fate would have it, the war came to a close in November of 1918 with the Central Powers on the losing side.  The Treaty of Versailles was signed in France and the map of Europe, and much of the Middle East, was redrawn.

Austria-Hungary was made two separate nations; Czechoslovakia and Yugoslavia were formed, and Germany, though still a nation, was no longer an empire.  Many of its territories were granted to the newly formed nations in Europe or to the victors of the war.  Germany, already in the grip of poverty from its loss, was slapped with heavy war reparations and slipped into a debilitating decay that would last for over a decade, and the Ottoman Empire fared no better; Turkey, after much turmoil and warfare within itself and with the winners of the war, became its own nation.  Its provinces in Europe either gained independence or were ceded to other European powers while France gained control of Syria and the English gained control of Kuwait, Iraq, Jordan, and most important of all, Palestine.

Though order was restored in Europe, however tenuously, darker things were on the horizon for the people of the old continent.  Out of the ashes of the First World War would rise the man whose name has become synonymous with tyranny, prejudice, and genocide: Adolf Hitler.

The disenfranchised youth, a native of Austria and soldier for Germany during the war, became a constant figure in Germany’s revolutionary political scene of the day, outraged at the abuse the country faced from the Allies of the war.  A notorious anti-Semite, while in prison, Hitler wrote the infamous “Mein Kampf,” or “My Struggle,” one of the world’s most famous pieces of propaganda literature.  After his release, he rose quickly through the ranks of a German political party of ragtag youths that would become known as the very military arm of hate – They were the Nazis.

Hitler soon became the leader of the Nazis as the group grew in the spotlight of the German public, not only in terms of notoriety, but in terms of acceptance.  The German people, languishing in the grip of poverty, bitterness, and a great depression, both national and personal, were ready to hear the words of a man who promised them both the necessities of life and a destiny of greatness, and perhaps most importantly, a scapegoat in the Jewish people.  Capitalizing on the historic anti-Semitism common among Westerners, especially Christians in the West, Hitler blamed the Jews for the ills of not only Germany, but Europe and even the world at large.  It was the Jews, he said, that caused unemployment, the Jews that caused inflation, the Jews that caused discrimination, the Jews that caused poverty, the Jews that caused crime; if there was an evil in the world, Hitler blamed the Jews.

In 1933, Hitler became chancellor of Germany and effective ruler of the country.  Nearly immediately, he began his plans of discrimination against Jews, over time banning them from schools, businesses, places of worship, and even the privacies of home life.  It wasn’t long before the mad despot began sending Jews to Concentration Camps by the hundreds of thousands.  This wave of death would spread out across much of the mainland of Europe with the arrival of World War II in 1939 and continue on for six years until Germany’s surrender in May 1945, resulting in the deaths of six million Jews and hundreds of thousands of others including Gays, Gypsies, Jehovah’s Witnesses, Communists, the disabled, or anyone who opposed Hitler’s regime.  The horrors of this period, which would come to be called the Holocaust, provided the final push for the initiation of many of the conflicts we see to this very day.

In 1947, the United States and Britain, regardless of their long history of anti-Semitism, in conjunction with the United Nations, agreed that as compensation for the tragedies of the Holocaust, the hopes of Zionist Jews should be realized and thus concluded that the Jewish people should be given their own homeland in the birthplace of Judaism – the land of Palestine, even if it meant throwing the people of Palestine to the wolves and advocating what would become the greatest force for anti-Semitism in the late 20th and soon-to-be 21st centuries.

So it was that the land was divided between Palestinians and the new-coming Israelis as the British prepared to relinquish control of the land.  The problem was that the Palestinian people, be they Muslims, Christians, or even Jews, were given no representation at the proceedings for the creation of the State of Israel.  

In 1948, Israel was newly established when its Western allies armed them to push Palestinian citizens off of their land, who had lived there for 1,400 years, by any means necessary.  Even the dividing of the land proved useless as Israelis broke the boundaries and took control of most of the land.  Retaliating Palestinian Christians and even many Palestinian Jews received equally harsh treatment as that of their Muslim compatriots for their opposition to the invasion of the home that they and many of the ancestors had known all their lives.  But we must ask ourselves several hard questions; what is Zionism?  What does it truly advocate?  Where did it come from?  Why is it an insult to Judaism?  Why is it more a cause of anti-Semitism than Jewish security in the world?

During the latter half of the 19th century, an idea was growing in resonance among many Jews, particularly those in Europe – this idea was Zionism, but what was it?  While it is true that Zionism does indeed advocate the presence of a homeland for Jews, and this in and of itself is not necessarily a negative idea, the principles of Zionism go far beyond the realm of equality on the world stage.  Zionism advocates the idea that only Jews may rule over the Holy Land regardless of the methods used to attain ruler-ship over the land and the land was given only to Jews and no one else regardless of the fact that Muslims and Christians consider the land equally sacred.  

So what’s so offensive to Judaism about Zionism?  Though often associated with Jewish theology, it was far from a growth in religious ideology and was in fact a movement advocated mainly by secular, more non-religious Jews, and while there were exceptions, the majority of religious Jews around the world, particularly those of the Orthodox form of the faith, were opposed to the idea of a Jewish State, largely due to the fact that this state would actually be based on secular, rather than truly Jewish ideals.  More importantly is that in Jewish theology, the Israelites were exiled by God as spoken of in the Tanakh (Old Testament), and therefore only God has the authority to restore the Jewish people to any sort of singular homeland, wherever that may be.  Religious Jews also believe that this cannot be attained by means of arms or force, political upheaval, or wicked action.  Furthermore, many religious Jews believe that the establishment of any Jewish homeland cannot occur until the end time with the coming of the Messiah (as Jews do not see Jesus as such).

Politically, millions of religious Jews opposed the state of Israel because it was believed that this would result in the displacement, oppression, and war with the people of Palestine and the Arab world at large, even many of those following Judaism, which was traditionally a religion respected and protected in the Muslim world because Islam views Jews and Christians as “People of the Book,” believers in the One True God and His revelations prior to Islam’s Qur’an, the Torah and the Gospel.  One element of proof for this fact is that throughout history, the greatest amount of anti-Semitism has come from Christians in the West, not Muslims.

These are concepts that still resonate today with millions of Jews around the world.  In the United States, Britain, Canada, and even Israel, millions of religious Jews, especially Orthodox Jews, take part in protests calling for the end of Zionism, voicing support for the Palestinians, and even peaceful dismantling of the State of Israel.  In the past 60 years, many Jewish anti-Zionist organizations have been formed such as Satmar, Naturei Karta, Jews Against Zionism, and Torah True Jews.  Some members of these groups have even become steadfast allies of groups like the PLO.  Likewise, the vast majority of Muslim countries around the world allow Jewish citizens to worship, do business, care for their families, and live their lives.  These countries do indeed make sure that there is a clear distinction between Zionism and Judaism and many Jews are also opponents of Israel, as are millions of Arab Christians, all of who are welcome to join and support anti-Zionist organizations

Zionism has become rather commonplace among American Christians, perhaps more so than amount American religious Jews.  But is Zionism really compatible with Scripture anyway?  Many advocates of Zionism cite God’s promise to Abraham in the Book of Genesis, but the promise actually states that God will give the land over to Abraham’s seed – we see nothing about a single religion.  And if Abraham’s seed is the one to whom the promise is given, then both the Israelites, fathered by Isaac, and the Arabs, fathered by Ishmael, have equal claim!  Even when religion is brought into the mix later, there is nothing specifically saying that the Israelites will be the only ones to prosper in or even rule over the land for all eternity and even if that was the original intent, this clearly changes later in the Tanakh.  After many times of violating God’s laws, according to Scripture, the Israelites are given over to the Babylonians and are told that they would never again be ruled over by one of their own kings until the end of time.  One could even argue that this promise is being kept today, because the land is ruled over not by the Israelites of old, but by Israelis, the modern inhabitants of the land.

One must understand then, that Israelites and Israelis are two completely different groups of people; the Israelites were an ancient people that have ceased to exist for almost 2,000 years because the majority of the ones that remained after the return from Babylon were finally driven out by the Romans after they destroyed Jerusalem in 70 AD and defeated the Sicarii Jews atop Masada in 73 AD.  Very few remained behind, the vast majority leaving and melding into the other cultures in the known world, and even the few that did remain would eventually meld into the peoples of the other kingdoms that would come to rule over the land.  In effect, the ancient Israelites no longer exist and were forced out not by Arabs, much less Muslims since Islam was established in the 7th century, but by Romans.  The Israelis on the other hand are merely modern inhabitants of the state of Israel, the majority of who come from European, American, and Arab descent.  This in and of itself also proves that Jews are not a race nor a nationality, but followers of a religion.

In theory, it was said that Israel was established to provide a safe home for the Jewish people in the homeland of their faith, but has this really been accomplished?  Consider this: Since the establishment of the State of Israel in 1948, the world has seen the bloodiest span of time in the Middle East since the Crusades.  And while most Muslims are not anti-Semitic, and are in fact tolerant and even respectful of Jews and Judaism, the animosity between Jews and Muslims has grown due to Israel’s extremist mentality in dealing with the Palestinians, thus causing the Palestinians to retaliate and the Israelis to continue their unfair oppression of the Palestinian people.  It is a violent cycle on both sides.  Certainly, this does not seem to be a safe haven for world Jewry.  On the contrary, bloodshed in the Middle East has only grown, both among the guilty and the innocent on both sides, since the establishment of the State of Israel, many of whom are in fact Jews, both Zionists and anti-Zionists.  So has this really caused a fall in anti-Semitism?  It wouldn’t seem so; many countries aside from the U.S. and Britain are at the very least critical of Israel’s policies and its endorsement of Zionist ideology, thus giving the rest of the world, particularly the Middle East, a false impression of Judaism, thus, in many ways, furthering anti-Semitic propaganda and extremism across the globe.

Without a doubt, there are those reading this and coming to the conclusion that I’m anti-Semitic due to my stance against Zionism; understand, I am not anti-Semitic in any way, shape, or form.  I have the utmost respect for Judaism and the Jewish people.  That was the purpose of this essay: To expose the truth about Zionism and the harm that it does to the Jewish people; to show that religious Judaism denounces Zionism because Zionism is itself, in many ways, is an anti-Semitic idea.

The ideas of Zionism are often embraced and glorified in the West, both among the religious and the secular community, but anyone that truly understands Judaism and by extension Christianity knows that Zionism is incompatible with Scripture in its very foundations, yet we are told, taught, and often believe otherwise.  To those giving favor Zionism, let me pose this point:

Many in the West simply see the Palestinians as a burden on the land; people who could simply live in peace if they went to one of the other Arab countries in the surrounding area despite the fact that the Palestinians have lived in the Holy Land for 1,400 years and the Israelis are new arrivals.  However, I doubt that many Americans would be receptive to the idea of having our homes taken by a foreign invader in the name of God and being told that we could simply go back to Europe, despite the fact that we were born and raised in this country as were our forefathers.  Ironically enough, this is almost exactly how we dealt with the Native Americans.  Why should the home of one people be sacrificed without their consent to create a home for another?

I am not condoning things such as suicide bombing or even, inherently, the destruction of Israel as the only solution.  The majority Palestinian people do not wish to see innocent Israeli citizens dead, but merely the Israeli military presence driven out of their home.  If a compromise can indeed be reached with both Palestinians and Israelis in agreement, I am in full support of the idea, but I do condone fairness, equality, and truth: To create a home for one people, we should not uproot and oppress another.  True enough, innocent Israeli citizens should not be dying in the streets of Jerusalem due to suicide bombers, but innocent Palestinian families should not be forced into the ghettos of Ramallah at gunpoint; Israeli tanks should not mow down unarmed Palestinian villages and call it a security measure.

We in the West must wake up and take heed of what Zionism truly is: It is a racist ideology that has become an offense to the Jewish religion and Jewish people and the main cause of anti-Semitic fervor around the world.  We must differentiate between Judaism and Zionism.  We must realize that Zionism has become and will continue to show itself as the greatest enemy of religious Judaism and the Jewish people.

Spencer Pennington
1/31/07
This is an essay I have written about the true nature of Zionism and how it has become a problem not only among Arabs, but among the Jewish religious community around the world, and thus how it is an offense to Judaism.

For further info, please see:

[link]
[link]
[link]

Take care.
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:iconfirewitch25:
FireWitch25 Featured By Owner Jul 13, 2014  Student General Artist
I'm glad there are people out there who knows about this! Zionism are like giving a bad perspective to Jews making everybody hate Jews, etc. Lovely work! Not only are Zionism are the enemies of Jews but to all of those other religions out there.
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:iconricopeekabo:
RicoPeekabo Featured By Owner Oct 26, 2011
Thank you for sharing this. It is amazing.
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:iconberhane-negus:
Berhane-Negus Featured By Owner Nov 1, 2011  Hobbyist Writer
You're very welcome, and thanks so much for the favorite! I'm glad you liked it!!
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:iconhayatli7:
hayatli7 Featured By Owner May 11, 2009  Hobbyist Writer
:O WOW! Nice work!

From a Palestinian, I say, Good Work! and never give up spreading the truth.
"Even in a minority of one the truth is still the truth" Gandhi

Zionism is not Judaism and Israel does not represent World Jewry.
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:iconberhane-negus:
Berhane-Negus Featured By Owner May 11, 2009  Hobbyist Writer
You have my sincerest thanks for your kinds words and the watch. I'm so glad you liked what I had to say here and at least read it with an open mind.

I hope always that all the children of Abraham will know peace, as will the whole world. I long to see Palestine one day, and God willing, I shall.
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:iconhayatli7:
hayatli7 Featured By Owner May 14, 2009  Hobbyist Writer
Ah you are aiming to go eh? I am leaving for Palestine on the 26th of June this year hopefully
I might write a few journal entries while I am there!
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:iconberhane-negus:
Berhane-Negus Featured By Owner May 14, 2009  Hobbyist Writer
I'd love to hear about it! I do plan to go one day. The Holy Land is a place I long to see.
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:iconhayatli7:
hayatli7 Featured By Owner May 29, 2009  Hobbyist Writer
Well apparently I should have fairly frequent internet access, so I will try to write journals and post pictures of what I see and do. Should be interesting. :)
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:iconberhane-negus:
Berhane-Negus Featured By Owner May 29, 2009  Hobbyist Writer
I look forward to it!
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:iconjewman89:
Jewman89 Featured By Owner Jan 5, 2009
I respectfully disaggree with and I hope we can agree to disagree.
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:iconberhane-negus:
Berhane-Negus Featured By Owner Jan 6, 2009  Hobbyist Writer
And I respectfully accept your comment. No harm done.
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:iconather1337:
Ather1337 Featured By Owner Sep 22, 2008
I found this [link] I think you'll be interested in it, I think it's related to this Editorial
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:iconberhane-negus:
Berhane-Negus Featured By Owner Sep 26, 2008  Hobbyist Writer
Thanks very much, brother. I'll read it in full soon! It looks very interesting!
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:iconather1337:
Ather1337 Featured By Owner Sep 26, 2008
Your welcome! :)
Reply
:iconcrimsontigress:
CrimsonTigress Featured By Owner Aug 27, 2008  Professional Traditional Artist
Are you even Jewish?

[link]

[link]

[link]

[link]
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:iconberhane-negus:
Berhane-Negus Featured By Owner Aug 27, 2008  Hobbyist Writer
First of all, no I'm not Jewish, but that doesn't mean I can't write on the subject of Judaic poltical and historical study. I have spent quite a long time studying theology, particularly the Abrahamic form and I wanted to express my opinion on this subject, much as you choose to do by commenting.

Second, I appreciate the articles and I did indeed read them, but I was already well aware of the information. I know where the name "Zionism" comes from and such and the Messianic prophecy of the Jewish people. I even point out in this essay that there is nothing wrong with Jews living in Palestine nor has there ever been, but that saying that this current state of Israel is laid down by God is false. Again this is my opinion.

Third, I am not a denier of the Holocaust or of the vile history of Antisemitism as I point out in my essay. In fact, I make note that historically, the most powerful and prevelant Antisemitism has come from the West. Being anti-Zionist is not inherently being anti-Semitic. Also, I am well aware of the situation of Neturei Karta. Chiefly, I used them as but one example of Orthodox Jews condemning Zionism. I never said I support their every action. As for why there were some of them present at the conference in Tehran, I am not sure, but I do know that many if not most Neturei Karta members are not Holocaust-deniers, especially since many of their parents and grandparents were survivors of the attrocities. Neturei Karta mainly subscribes to the idea that the Holocaust has been used for sympathy in turning a blind eye to whatever Israel does.

Thanks for commenting and feel free to reply.
Reply
:iconcrimsontigress:
CrimsonTigress Featured By Owner Aug 28, 2008  Professional Traditional Artist
"First of all, no I'm not Jewish"

Then stop right there ... sure, you can hold an opinion. We all can. However you do not have the right to tell people of another faith how to practice their religion. That is exactly what you are doing and with a limited understanding of Jewish culture, heritage, and dogma. Shame on you. The links I provided you show other opinions within Judaism, those of predominance.

That is all I will say. I was not calling you an antisemite, per say. However, I find it quite dubious that no one can tell anyone else how to practice their religion, in less we're talking about Judaism. Then non-Jews feel they have the right to stand on a soap box and take a minority fringe group and decide that it is the "true" Judaism, simply because it fits an agenda.

Bottom line, Israel exists. There's no time machine. And to ethnically cleanse the area and destroy a sovereign country that is in existence is deplorable. One questions how that is NOT antisemitism at the end of the day.

Once again, shame on you.
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:iconberhane-negus:
Berhane-Negus Featured By Owner Aug 28, 2008  Hobbyist Writer
I see quite a few non-Muslims advising Muslims on how their religion should be practiced these days. I even see examples of non-Christians telling Christians how to practice their religion. (In case you're wondering, I am a Christian.) Do you hold the same opinion when the shoe is on the other foot?

And again, the links you provided me show me nothing that I haven't already seen. And I have no agenda; I don't believe politicians, parties, or nationalistic ideologies. I presented a number of Orthodox Jewish groups that stand against Zionism, and I have met many Jews who are at the very least critical of Israel, some of which are anti-Zionist. I am sharing my opinion on how I feel about Zionism and its relation to Orthodox Jewish Law and the contradictions I see therein.

Lastly, I am aware that Israel exists and I never called for ethnic cleansing or condoned it. Where you get this idea from my writing is beyond me. I've discussed religion with you before and at no point did I ever say "shame on you" for expressing your beliefs.
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:iconcrimsontigress:
CrimsonTigress Featured By Owner Aug 29, 2008  Professional Traditional Artist
If you don't like it, then don't do it to others.
Reply
:iconather1337:
Ather1337 Featured By Owner Jun 22, 2008
I see now, This explains a lot!
Reply
:iconberhane-negus:
Berhane-Negus Featured By Owner Jun 22, 2008  Hobbyist Writer
I'm glad you like it - Religious Judaism opposes Zionism. Thanks for the add, by the way!

Asalaamu alaykum.
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:iconather1337:
Ather1337 Featured By Owner Jun 22, 2008
Just wanted to keep track of your stuff!
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:icondashinvaine:
dashinvaine Featured By Owner Apr 27, 2008
A very well reasoned account, with which I am in full agreement. Such an obvious truth it is astonishing that anyone can be blind to it. Modern Israel is entrenched in a benighted mindset and doesn't recognize that it is its own worst enemy. What is unfortunate and ironic is that for more than half a century the Zionists have evoked the holocaust so often to silence any criticism of their own actions. The Zionists, in their chauvinism and intolerance, are a reflection of the facists who persecuted European jewry. I would not wish to see Israel entirely demolished, but the occupation of Palestine is a disgrace to humanity and must be eneded.
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:iconberhane-negus:
Berhane-Negus Featured By Owner Apr 27, 2008  Hobbyist Writer
Thank you so much. I appreciate more your kind words than your agreement with what I have written. My thanks, too, though for your being actually knowledgeable about this subject. Zionism has disgraced the name of the Jewish people, and its anti-Zionist religious adherents are making their voices heard publically, even if they cannot be found on the American media machine.

It is very true, criticism or condemnation of Israel is not inherently anti-Semitic, and for all its horrors, the Holocaust cannot be a shield for Zionists to hide behind - mass genocide of the Jewish people does not give the Zionists the right to slowly carry out similar crimes against the Palestinians.

Thank you again.
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:icondashinvaine:
dashinvaine Featured By Owner Apr 27, 2008
Indeed.
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:iconlaetitiaferra:
laetitiaferra Featured By Owner Oct 25, 2007
I am sorry, I really like that you dare to argue a topicyou cannot possiby know because you don't know our cuture (you don't speak Hebrew, weren't brought up as a Jew, don't read the Thora in its original language, you dont know the mentality...I doubt youve ever BEEN to Israel).... but you just don't know enough.... sorry...
I wrote a journal entry about my opinion on this if you are still interested in why I answered you this way, but it's really long.
Thanx for your time and effort though
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:iconberhane-negus:
Berhane-Negus Featured By Owner Oct 25, 2007  Hobbyist Writer
I will concede that I don't read Hebrew, nor speak much of it, nor did I study the Torah in its original language, and I have yet to visit the Holy Land, but I fail to see where translation of the Tanakh dampens my argument. By that logic, then, you must assert that all most Christians cannot understand their own religion because they are not fluent in Greek. I'm pointing out theological points presented in Jewish Scripture. My not being a Jew means that I can't understand Judaism? With all due respect, we don't need to hurl insults. I've devoted seven years of my life to the study of history and theology and have conducted detailed research on each major religion and its history, especially those of the Abrahamic variety. Just because I'm not a Jew doesn't mean I can't understand the Jewish faith or Jewish customs. By that logic, I could assert that because you are not a Christian that you cannot understand Christianity, but clearly, such a statement is not mine to make.

I will be taking a look at that journal. If you took offense to what I've written here, my apologies. I've presented nothing anti-Semitic or hateful toward the Jewish people. I am always open to discussion.
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:iconlaetitiaferra:
laetitiaferra Featured By Owner Oct 25, 2007
No, God, I am really enjoying talking to you. Never would I try to silence your arguments with accusations of anti-semitism unless there were reasons to believe so and there haven't been so far.
I talked to a Rabbi today when I was on campus and he explained that the Neturei Carta Jews don't follow many laws that Jews follow today.
As for the language, yes, it is somewhat of a problem because: The word Na'ara means "young woman" in Hebrew and not virgin so it could already start a debate about the Christian Mother Mary's virginity (which is not my intention, it was just an example). I believe that unless you speak a language, you won't fully understand the semantic undertone a religion or old text has. Some things can not be translated, such as the Hebrew "Tsapichit." It says in the Thora: "they ate tsapichit" with mana, and rumour has it that "tsapichit" is a bisquit but nobody knows what it really is. And to be a priest, don't you need to study Greek and Aramaic anyways? It has been translated into Greek from Aramaic, so just think what all these translations can do to a text. Once I called someone "pathetic" in English which in German means "upset" and the disaster was complete (pathos comes from Greek meaning emotion, but it has become an idiosyncrasy in English, just like the word "sympathetic"). You should read George Steiner's autobiography and how he describes the translation of any book to be somewhat of a risk in the sense that a language can add many cultural subtones into a translation. Language is a reflection of a culture. Did you know that the verbe "to succeed" doesn't exist in Russian? I didn't ever try to insult you but I feel appalled that the people representing Judaism for you is a three thousand out of 14 Million community which in fact does NOT observe the laws of Judaism as believed to be interpreted correctly. So to believe that the Neturei Carta are the ones to hold the key answer to Judaism's complexity is an insult to Judaism.
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:iconberhane-negus:
Berhane-Negus Featured By Owner Oct 25, 2007  Hobbyist Writer
I appreciate your kindness and curtousy. I read and commented on that journal. My comment to, is rather long, so you need not read or reply to it if you don't wish, or if you do, you may reply to it here instead of having our discussion occur in two places.

I do understand that language CAN be a problem; I meant to ask where it faltered my particular argument here. And just so that you're aware, your example about Mary doesn't bother me; I may be a Christian, but I have friends of all faiths and opinions, some of whom believe Mary was not a virgin at all. A good book on the subject of translation, by the way, is Bart D. Ehrman's "Misquoting Jesus". I'll look up that George Steiner book you mentioned. Those instances about German and Russian are rather interesting. I wasn't aware of that. And from what I understand, having to be trained in Greek (or any other language) sometimes varies depending on the body of Christianity, I think. I believe Roman Catholics are trained in both Latin, of course, and Greek, as are some others, but more American branches of Christianity, I'm not sure if it's a requirement or not. I personally don't sponsor any church myself.

As for Neturei Karta's figures, I've heard upwards of over a million are members, not to mention members of other anti-Zionist groups, and those anti-Zionists who are not in groups.
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:iconlaetitiaferra:
laetitiaferra Featured By Owner Oct 25, 2007
I'll keep that book in mind. As for mine, look for the title "Errata", something "unexamined life." Thanx for talking to me, I know I can become quite rambunctious sometimes; not to kiss up to you, but I sincerely enjoy our dicussion anyways
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:iconberhane-negus:
Berhane-Negus Featured By Owner Oct 26, 2007  Hobbyist Writer
I'll look it up. And thank you for the discussion as well. Indeed, opinions and sometimes emotions run high. It's not kissing up; I appreciate the discussion. I would rather have an honest but friendly discussion with someone who is educated on the subject than with someone who just talks off the top of their head. I saw that you replied to my other comment as well. No worries there, I will reply to that very soon, but I'm afraid that for the moment, I have to wrap up my evening with some studying.

Shalom
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:iconlaetitiaferra:
laetitiaferra Featured By Owner Oct 24, 2007
Your essay is really well written; however, the Nutrei Carta religious Jews don't condemn Zionism because of the Middle East conflict, they don't want the State of Israel to exist because they believe that only the arrival of the Messiah can establish the real Israeli state. They are a very small number amongst Jews but are very violent in defending their beliefs.
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:iconberhane-negus:
Berhane-Negus Featured By Owner Oct 24, 2007  Hobbyist Writer
I appreciate the compliment; I know why they condemn Zionism, and yes, it is largely because of the Messianic prophecy. But then, we have to ask ourselves, who follows religious Judaism more closely? The Israelis, most of whom practice a semi-secular form of Judaism, or the Neturei Karta, who adhere strictly to Jewish Law and Theology? As for violence, I haven't heard of any violent acts on their part; not to say that it doesn't exist, but I've never seen violence sanctioned by their organization. In fact, I've seen more violence against them than I have from them. For example, there was a silent Neturei Karta demonstration on the Sabbath. One of the Rabbis was holding a sign that condemned Zionism and was attacked by a devout Baptist Christian.

While Neturei Karta doesn't represent most Jews in and of itself, most religious Jews, from my research, are at least critical of Israel, if not completely opposed to its existance, especially Jews that I know. Neturei Karta has thousands of members, to be sure. But there are several other Jewish anti-Zionism groups, which have many members as well, and of course, not all anti-Zionist Jews are going to be in set organizations; but among the religious Jewish community, anti-Zionism seems to be very prevelant.

Thank you for the comment.
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:iconlaetitiaferra:
laetitiaferra Featured By Owner Oct 24, 2007
The majority of Israel (80%) is of Sephardic decent, Jews who came from tightly knit religious communities; so the majority of Israel is observant; to say that the Neturei Carta Jews know the Thora better or follow the Thora's laws in a better way is wrong already because Jews come from all parts of the world. Many of them have different customs. E.g. Ashkenasi Jewry seperates dairy and meat dishes while for some Sephardis it is allowed to use the same plate if it is clear glass. This is just a tiny fraction of the spectra of Jewish diversities and therefore there is not just "a Jewish law" that creates a monade of Jewish culture against a bunch of ignorants; Jewish culture is abundant with different laws.
One of the reasons why the Neturei Carta disagree with Israel's current existance is also because they do not want any Jews to live a different religious life from their customs; in fact, the Neturei Carta people I talked to and heard about so far claim that Sephardis aren't even real Jews but Arabs, which, since Sephardis have faced a large oppression when still living in Muslim countries, is very hurtful to them (and actually is THE way to offend them deeply). Another reason is that tey do not want secular people to rule the land.
If you ask any religious community in Brooklyn from Habad, they would tell you quite some stories; more than once have Neturei Carta Jews started violent fist fights with the Habad Rabbis. In 2004, a Neturei Carta Rabbi visited the UC of Irvine and claimed that the Shoah had never happened. After this shocking intrigue, he started yelling at some of the Persian Jews in the audience and called them "traitors", since they - in his eyes - were nothing but Arabs who had turned against their countries. It is actually unnecessairy to add that he caused quite a stir, considering that those particular Persian Jews had left Iran under the threat of death, leaving their family members behind and, in one case, losing their captured mother to Iranian jail for over 10 years.
I have experienced that the Neturei Carta are a very agressive minority and go gainst many Judaistic customs e.g. against Rambams teachings.
As for the Jews who are anti-zionistic: Sadly, the term "Zionism" has been widely misused and equalized with racism; many people don't actually know what that term means historically and create a dangerous idiosyncrasy.
I really hope you'll find the time to answer since I'd really like to know your point of view on this.
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:iconberhane-negus:
Berhane-Negus Featured By Owner Oct 25, 2007  Hobbyist Writer
I would agree that the majority of Israeli people are descended from devoutly Jewish families, which is all well and good, but doesn't mean much. Most Israelis today, while partially observant, are also semi-secular and do not observe the full spectrum of the laws of the Torah. This was in fact reinforced by studies done on the History Channel. So even though their ancestors may have been observant Shephardic Jews, that doesn't mean that they fall into the same category if they themselves are not observant. Most of my earlier ancestors were devout Anglo-Irish Catholics, but there hasn't actually been a Catholic in my family for three generations. Just because I'm descended from people who were practicing Catholics doesn't mean I fall into that category.

I am also aware that different Jewish groups have different traditions interspersed with Jewish law; the same can be said of most major religions, however, that doesn't change the fact that there is a set code of laws that must be observed, and in some sense are by religious Jewish communities across the board, but many Israelis fail to recognize several aspects of religious Judaism, for example, the prophecy of the Messiah, or the maintanence of beard and hair, nor is Israel governed by the religious law of the Torah; it is governed by a semi-secular body that claims to be Jewish, and as such, is a reason for Neturei Karta opposing Israel. While I can't speak for every aspect Neturei Karta's beliefs, I can say that I agree, insofar as they want Jews to be religious Jews, not secularists.

As for this Neturei Karta Rabbi you mention, I have no problem in agreeing with you that this fellow was wrong in his statements; certainly, every group has fanatics, but most of what I understand about Neturei Karta's practice of Judaism seems to be in line with Judaism, as with most religious Jewish communities. I can say that I'm sorry for this man's actions and remarks, but I wouldn't think he represents the whole of the group.

About the anti-Zionist Jews, they oppose it because Zionism, in most cases, has stood against religious Judaism: It violates the prophecies of the Tanakh, in many cases does away with Jewish law, and is actually based from the views of Secularists; from what I understand, the father of Zionism, Theodore Herzl was a Secularist, or was a Secularist at least in part.

One major idea that Zionism puts forth that is seen as offensive is the idea that the Jews are a race; the Jews are in fact followers of a religion. If the Jews were a race, there couldn't be Black Jews in Ethiopia or Shephardic Jews in Spain, or Hungarian Jews in Hungary, or Persian Jews in Iran. If the Jews were a race, then people could not convert to the Jewish faith. One can come from a family with a Jewish background, certainly, but it is not ingrained in one's genetics.
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:iconstelthman:
Stelthman Featured By Owner May 25, 2007  Hobbyist Interface Designer
Here r some links that support what u say my friend :

[link]

[link]

Have a good day..
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:iconberhane-negus:
Berhane-Negus Featured By Owner May 25, 2007  Hobbyist Writer
Many thanks for your comment and information, my friend.

Asalaamu alykum
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:iconstelthman:
Stelthman Featured By Owner May 26, 2007  Hobbyist Interface Designer
Wa alaycom al salam wa rahmato allahe wa barakato..
Happy to help my friend :)
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:iconeman-ezzat:
eman-ezzat Featured By Owner May 10, 2007
I love opinions backed with factual information. Great history lesson for all who read this! The topic is also one that is often ignored to often......That's The Truth ...... Peace and love....:D
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:iconberhane-negus:
Berhane-Negus Featured By Owner May 10, 2007  Hobbyist Writer
Mnay thanks, brother. The truth must be told. Peace and love to you as well.
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:iconeman-ezzat:
eman-ezzat Featured By Owner May 12, 2007
Mnay thanks, brother.
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:iconsenem:
senem Featured By Owner Apr 23, 2007
Thanks for spreading the truth!
:peace:
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:iconberhane-negus:
Berhane-Negus Featured By Owner Apr 23, 2007  Hobbyist Writer
No thanks is needed, my friend :) Peace and love.
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:icontortuegraphics:
tortuegraphics Featured By Owner Mar 13, 2007
I admire you to write this kind of text - a kind of "roman fleuve" like we use to say in French!
The problem is that your theory is 100% wrong!

Don't worry I won't dissect your work!
I just want to show you that you are building a theory on false informations because are ignorant - and I can'r blame you because I don't know much about Islam for example.

Where I don't understand you is how you dare using and deforming a religion to reach your goals and publishing this kind of propaganda.
Internet is a fabulous place because you can learn about almost everything but you can propagate noises and rumors like anywhere on earth!

...you wrote:
These are concepts that still resonate today with millions of Jews around the world. In the United States, Britain, Canada, and even Israel, millions of religious Jews, especially Orthodox Jews, take part in protests calling for the end of Zionism, voicing support for the Palestinians, and even peaceful dismantling of the State of Israel. In the past 60 years, many Jewish anti-Zionist organizations have been formed such as Satmar, Naturei Karta, Jews Against Zionism, and Torah True Jews....
millions of religious Jews you say??????!!!
:-)

source wikipedia
>>Satmar: [link]
about 120,000 adherents
The dynasty traces its roots to Rabbi Moshe Teitelbaum (1759-1841), Rabbi of Satoraljaujhely in Hungary.

>>Naturei Karta:
[link]
Neturei Karta (Aramaic: נטורי קרתא, "Guardians of the City") is a small[1] group of Haredi Jews who reject all forms of Zionism and actively oppose the existence of the State of Israel.
...
Other Orthodox Jewish movements, including some who oppose Zionism, have denounced Neturei Karta's activities; according to The Guardian, "[e]ven among Charedi, or ultra-Orthodox circles, the Neturei Karta are regarded as a wild fringe". [4] Neturei Karta claims that the mass media deliberately downplays their viewpoint and makes them out to be few in number. Their protests in America are usually attended by, at most, a few dozen people. In Israel, several hundred is typical, depending on the nature of the protest and its location
...
For the most part, the members of Neturei Karta are descended from Hungarian Jews who settled in Jerusalem's Old City in the early nineteenth century, and from Lithuanian Jews who were students of the Gaon of Vilna, who had settled earlier. In the late nineteenth century, they participated in the creation of new neighborhoods
...

>>Jews Against Zionism: can you explain me the difference with Neturei Karta?...
You just ad names to present a longer list?

>>Torah True JewsNo more than a website linked to Neturei Karta
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:iconberhane-negus:
Berhane-Negus Featured By Owner Mar 13, 2007  Hobbyist Writer
Many thanks for the constructive comment.

Well, first of all, I see your debates with some of my statistics, which I will address in a moment, but theologically, I see no falsehoods - the points I made about the difference between Israelis and Israelites, the expulsion of the Israelites by the Romans, and the meaning of the Jewish homeland according to the Tanakh is correct. The Tanakh, and by extension the Christian Scriptures as well, maintain that Jehovah made a promise that the Israelites would never again have their own king until the end time and that this would be in the form of the Messiah descended from the line of David, and since Jews do not see Jesus as such, they still await this Messiah and by extension the homeland, which is not identified as needing to be in the same place as before, or even as a physical homeland at all. I also make my point with the Abrahamic promise and the idea that the Jews are not a race; after all, if the Jews were a race, how could there be a nearly 3,000 year-old Jewish tradition in Ethiopia? Or Jews of Hungarian descent?

I'm not corrupting or twisting the Jewish faith at all - I'm simply going by what I know to be in the Tanakh, which Zionism, in many cases, fails to do. Most Israelis are more secular in their thinking and do not observe full Jewish law, particularly that of the Torah. Members of groups like Neturei Karta, however, do: They keep a strict kosher diet, observe the Sabbath, believe strictly and without compromise in the theology of the Tanakh, and practice the maintainance of beards and long hair as is prescribed in the Book of Leviticus.

Going to my statistics - I am well aware that some groups may only have a few thousand adherents, and that Satmar is one of the smaller groups, but there are other groups, which is why I listed them. Estimates for Neturei Karta's membership, for example, can range anywhere from a few thousand to nearly a million depending on the source, which, I am full aware, is open to debate. I am also aware of Neturei Karta's criticism even by other Jewish anti-Zionist organizations, but on one this level this helps to prove my point that there are indeed dozens of Jewish anti-Zionist groups.

And I'm not too surprised about the group's origins or that they were trying to establish neighborhoods: They weren't trying to establish a full homeland in violation of Messianic prophecy and certainly weren't trying to take land from the Palestinians. In fact, a section of Jerusalem devoted entirely to Jews was an idea that was protected and honored by the Muslims. They even fought together in the Crusades. Under Islamic law, Jews and Christians are seen as "People of the Book," meaning people who worship God and adhere to His revelations prior to the Quran; the Torah and the Gospel - hence the fact that these scriptures are respected in Islam and even considered sacred and the belief in the same Prophets such as Noah, Abraham, Isaac, Ishmael, Jacob, Joseph, Moses, David, Solomon, Elijah, John the Baptist, and Jesus. Because of this status, Christians and Jews (and people of other religions in other countries, such as Zoroastrians in Persia, Hindus in India, and Buddhists in Indonesia) have been historically allowed the right to worship in synagogues and churches, care for their families, and do business. Take for example Moorish Spain: Under the rule of the Muslim Moors, the Jews were so well treated that many Jewish historians call it the "Golden Age of Judaism". Most Muslim countries subscribe to this mentality today.

About the other sources, yes, these organizations are similar - nearly identical, in fact - and in some cases interconnected, but see themselves and promote themselves as seperate entities: Take for example groups like the United Negro Improvement Assosiation and the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People here in the United States: Same goals, different names. Also, remember, not all anti-Zionist Jews would be in organizations. Most Jews I know are at least critical of Israel, if not completely opposed to its existence, even those of a secular persuasion. Given all of these organizations and their combined numbers, not to mention anti-Zionist Jews not in organizations, the number I presented doesn't seem too grandiose to me.

Many thanks again, sir.

Shalom aleichom.
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:iconjaakobou:
jaakobou Featured By Owner Mar 5, 2007
from the very part you said both "in the land of palestine" instead of in the jewish homeland... and then you went on to discuss the "natives being thrown to the wolves" was the moment i stopped reading.

1) you chose a side and misrepresent things with utmost bias.
2) those people were paid!... here's a book with over 50 names: [link]
3) neturei karta are irrelevant people who can't even read the talmud properly.
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:iconberhane-negus:
Berhane-Negus Featured By Owner Mar 5, 2007  Hobbyist Writer
If you choose to stop reading, be my guest, but please have the respect to actually read all of what I have written before you criticize me. The fact is, why should I use the term "Jewish Homeland"? The Palestinians were there long before the modern Israelis and had nothing to do with the forcing of the ancient Israelites from the land. And that land is just as sacred to them as it is to you.

1) If you want to accuse me of bias, go right ahead, but I see you offering no points. You too, are biased. I have seen some of your debates on deviations of your own where people make statements that you don't like and you block them - don't preach to me about bias. Furthermore, having bias is human nature. My bias here is to those whose rights have been violated, including the rights of those killed in suicide attacks and the rights of the true Jewish community.

2) Please show me that list. I would be more than happy to take a look. I'm afraid I can't simply buy a book that you suggest just because you say it has a list without my knowing.

3) I fail to see how Neturei Karta is an irrelevant group: Their membership numbers over one million, and I mention other Jewish anti-Zionist groups as well. I should also add that most Jews I know personally are not too fond of Israel either. Furthermore, I don't see you offering up a better or more rational interperetation of the Torah or the Talmud.

You have shared a few videos with me in the past, which I have watched...apparently when it comes to my writing, you won't give me the same courtesy, but allow me to share a couple videos with you:

[link]
[link]
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:icondancewiththesky:
dancewiththesky Featured By Owner Mar 25, 2007
For 2, In Ben Ami's words [link]

"the Palestinian peasants did not have the full control of their own destiny. Part of that land was bought by the Zionist organizations from Affendis, landowners living in Turkey or anywhere else throughout the Ottoman Empire, and these people were inevitably evicted by these kind of transactions. But as a whole, I think that not more than 6 or 7% of the entire surface of the state of Israel was bought. The rest of it was either taken over or won during the war."
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:iconberhane-negus:
Berhane-Negus Featured By Owner Mar 25, 2007  Hobbyist Writer
Sorry for the confusion, brother, but was this a comment to me or Jaakobou? As you know, I'm well aware about the reality of the situation in the Holy Land :)
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:icondancewiththesky:
dancewiththesky Featured By Owner Mar 25, 2007
I know :) but it was for you pointing out yet another one of his lies
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